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    DIRECTOR
    Thomas M. Gau
    1810 East Hazelton Avenue
    Stockton, CA 95205
    (209) 468-3000 Phone
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IMPORTANT NEW FLOOD  PROTECTION  INFORMATION
FOR SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY RESIDENTS & PROPERTY OWNERS

FLOOD PROTECTION
FAQ's
Page Last Updated 08/05/2014

07-21-10 REVISED FAQs

PLEASE NOTE!: In May, 2010, FEMA issued a press release announcing that it is extending the time period during which properties newly mapped into a Special Flood Hazard Area are eligible for the Preferred Risk Policy ("PRP") flood insurance coverage.
The press release stated in part that, "Effective January 1, [2011,] ...the discounted rate will be available, for the two year period, to owners whose buildings were found to be in a SFHA (Special Flood Hazard Area) following a flood map revision that went into effect on, or after, October 1, 2008...At the end of the extended two-year period, policies on these buildings will return to standard-rated policies." Please contact your flood insurance agent to obtain more information.



See Also:  Provisionally Accredited Levees FAQ's

 

  1. What is a Flood Hazard Map or FIRM?

  2. What is the FEMA Map Modernization Program?

  3. When did the new Maps become effective?

  4. Will there be more changes to the Flood Insurance Rate Maps?

  5. Who Is responsible for the Maps?

  6. Why did San Joaquin County get new Flood Insurance Rate Maps?

  7. When did we have serious flooding in this area?

  8. What is my risk? Is my family safe?

  9. What is a Floodplain?

  10. What is a 100-year Flood Event?

  11. Is there a problem, and what is being done to protect us?

  12. What is a Special Flood Hazard Area, and how do I determine if my property is located in this area on the Flood Insurance Rate Maps?

  13. How do Flood Insurance Rate Maps affect me?

  14. Why did only certain areas of the County have changes to their Flood Insurance requirements?

  15. What happens when a property is placed in a Special Flood Hazard Area (100-year Floodplain)?

  16. What is a "Federally-Regulated Lender"?

  17. What is the "Grandfathering Rule" and how can it help me?

  18. How can I tell if I will be required to purchasing insurance?

  19. What happens if I did not buy Flood Insurance by October 15, 2009? 

  20. Is there any way I can pay less than the expensive "A-Zone" premium if I waited until after October 15, 2009, to buy Flood Insurance? 

  21. What happens if I refuse to purchase Flood Insurance when I have been notified by my Lender that I am required to do so?

  22. What will happen if my property changes from a High-Risk to a Lower-Risk designation?

  23. How might the new Flood Maps affect me financially?

  24. What if my home or business is mapped into a High-Risk area but I believe the designation is in error?

  25. Why were Smith Canal Levees de-accredited by FEMA?

  26. Only drainage water from within the City of Stockton flows to Smith Canal during storms. Where would the Flood Water come from?

  27. What is being done to provide 100-year Flood Protection for the Country Club area?

  28. Can new homes, businesses, and other structures be built in Special Flood Hazard areas?

  29. Can improvements, such as additions and remodels, be made to existing homes, businesses, and other structures within Special Flood Hazard areas?

  30. Why should an owner suffer what seems to be a penalty for upgrading and/or improving a structure?

  31. If a home, business, or other structure within a Special Flood Hazard area is damaged by fire, flood, wind, or other source of damage, can it be repaired?

  32. The new Special Flood Hazard areas are designated "Zone A" with no Base Flood Elevation (BFE) shown.  Who determines the Regulatory BFE for these areas?

  33. What if our Community did not participate in the NFIP?

  34. Where can I get more information?

 

 

1.  WHAT IS A FLOOD HAZARD MAP OR FIRM?
Flood hazard maps, officially known as Flood Insurance Rate Maps, or "FIRMs," show the flood risk to your home or business as determined by FEMA.

 

2.  What is the FEMA Map Modernization Program?
As part of the National Flood Insurance Program, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) develops Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) to identify areas at risk of flooding and to determine flood insurance rates.  The Map Modernization Program is an effort by FEMA to update old FIRMs nationwide.  FEMA has now updated the FIRMs for San Joaquin County and all the Cities in the County. 

 

3. WHEN DID THE NEW MAPS BECOME EFFECTIVE?
The new FIRMs became effective and regulatory on October 16, 2009.

 

4. WILL THERE BE MORE CHANGES TO THE FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAPS?
Yes, more map changes are expected within the next two years.  The October 16, 2009 FIRMs have some land areas that are marked as "PROTECTED...BY A LEVEE SYSTEM THAT HAS BEEN PROVISIONALLY ACCREDITED..."  Some of the levees will become accredited levees, others might lose accreditation by FEMA.  All or part of the land behind de-accredited levees will then be shown on a new map as Special Flood Hazard Area.  Your Floodplain Administrator will notify you before the maps change.  For more information on the Provisionally Accredited Levee (PAL) Agreements, please refer to the "PAL FAQs"  at http://www.sjgov.org/pubworks/PAL_FAQ.htm.   

 

5.  WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE MAPS?
The FIRMs are FEMA’s maps, used to administer the National Flood Insurance Program.  In the process of creating the updated maps, FEMA consulted with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and State and local agencies regarding levee inspections and adequacy.  Local agencies submitted comments and suggested corrections to the proposed maps.

 

6.  WHY DID SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY GET NEW FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAPS?
San Joaquin County’s FIRMs were out of date.  Some formerly rural areas were never mapped in detail, and other areas had not been re-mapped in more than 29 years.  Over time, water flow, levee conditions, and drainage patterns change due to erosion, land use, and natural forces.  The likelihood of flooding in certain areas changes along with these factors.

 

7.  WHEN DID WE HAVE SERIOUS FLOODING IN THIS AREA?
San Joaquin County has experienced major flooding several times during the 20th Century.  The City of Stockton experienced flooding in 1955 and 1958.  McDonald Island flooded in 1982, when the levee failed.  1983 saw area wide local flooding from heavy rains, with levee failures in the Delta and along the San Joaquin River.  In 1986, flooding affected Delta islands and the town of Thornton following a levee break.  There was a near "100-year" storm event during the winter of 1997, which caused flooding in the Delta and along the San Joaquin and Stanislaus Rivers including areas between Manteca and Tracy.  The most recent levee break occurred in 2004, at Jones Tract west of Stockton.

 

8. WHAT IS MY RISK?  IS MY FAMILY SAFE?
Floods are the most likely natural disaster to occur in our area.  Your local government is doing its best to make wise investments in flood protection to safeguard lives and property.  Still, just as people who live in earthquake or wildfire-prone areas should have a plan in case of emergency, all San Joaquin County residents should know their flood risk and have an emergency plan.  The Office of Emergency Services website provides guidance on disaster preparedness to protect your family in case of emergency, including a flood: www.sjgov.org/oes/.  To learn how to prepare your family for an emergency, visit www.plan2survive.org, or call the Office of Emergency Services at (209) 953-6200.

 

9. WHAT IS A FLOODPLAIN?  
A floodplain is the part of the land where water collects, pools, and flows during the course of natural high-water events.  San Joaquin County is located in a historic natural floodplain.  Before we had levees and other flood protection infrastructure, our entire area was frequently covered with water.  The levees and other flood control infrastructure provide limited protection to certain areas by forcing high water to flow past us without flooding.  For the Map Modernization process, we speak of a property as being “in the floodplain” if it is within an area not considered to be protected from a "100-year flood."  This includes some properties that are not protected by any levees, or properties that are protected by levees that are not expected to provide protection against a 100-year or greater flood. 

 


10. What is a “100-year flood event”?
A "100-year flood event" is a fairly large, historically-infrequent flood.  To be precise, it is a flood of a size that is projected to have only a one-percent (one in 100) chance of being equaled or exceeded each year.  This does not mean that this size of flood will only occur once every 100 years.  The likelihood of a 100-year flood occurring within a 100-year stretch of time is very high, but there is no way to predict when the next flood will occur – or the one after that.  We could have several 100-year floods in a short period of time, or we might not see a 100-year flood in our lifetimes or our grandchildren’s lifetimes.   

 

11. IS THERE A PROBLEM, AND WHAT IS BEING DONE TO PROTECT US?
San Joaquin County’s existing flood control facilities, including levees, have been improved and maintained to provide the relatively high level of flood protection that our area currently has.  However, stricter standards from the federal and state governments will necessitate additional improvements and will require some property owners to purchase flood insurance.  In addition, newly enacted State law will require an even higher level of flood protection (200-year) in future years for our urban areas, to guard against historically infrequent but potentially severe high-water events.

The San Joaquin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District formed a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) in May 2006.  The TAC has been meeting regularly since formation and includes representatives from the County, several of our cities, reclamation districts, and other flood protection interests.  The group is continually working to monitor our flood protection situation, share information with the various local levee agencies, and recommend flood protection improvements, both short-term and long-term, to our local, State, and Federal elected officials.  The TAC normally meets the fourth Friday of every month.  Please contact the Flood Management Division at (209) 468-3061 if you would like more information about the Flood Protection TAC. 

 

12. What is a Special Flood Hazard Area, aND HOW DO I DETERMINE IF MY PROPERTY IS LOCATED IN THIS AREA ON THE FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAPS?
FEMA classifies land as a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) if it is located in a 100-year flood zone on the current effective FIRM.  The floodplain administrator for your community can determine which parcels are now included in the "100-year floodplain," or "A-Zone," on the new FIRMs effective October 16, 2009.  This determination is done using computerized mapping software that integrates FEMA’s flood zone data with Assessor’s Parcel Number (APN) data.  (Please refer to the contacts at the end of these questions for the telephone number of the appropriate floodplain administrator to contact for your specific property, and links to map websites.) 

 

13.  HOW DO FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAPS (FIRMs) AFFECT ME?
By showing the extent to which areas of San Joaquin County – and individual properties – are at risk for flooding, FIRMs help home and business owners understand their flood risk and make more informed financial decisions about protecting their property.  All property owners are advised to become educated about their property’s flood risk, and to consider purchasing flood insurance.  In some cases, flood insurance is required, based on your FEMA-designated flood zone.  FIRMs also allow community planners, local officials, engineers, builders and others to make important determinations about where and how new structures and developments should be built to minimize flood risk.  Because San Joaquin County participates in the National Flood Insurance Program, we must follow the Program’s rules and regulations for what and how we build in SFHA. 

 

14.  Why DID only certain AREAs of the County have changes to their flood insurance requirements? 
Flood insurance requirements are based on your flood risk zone shown on the FIRMs.  During the Map Modernization process, FEMA evaluated the current condition of our flood protection levees and compared our levees to their standards.  Based on these inspections, as well as the updated water flow and drainage patterns, FEMA redrew the boundaries of the flood risk zones for our County.  This changed flood insurance requirements for some property owners on October 16, 2009, when FEMA’s new FIRMs went into effect. 

 

15. WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A PROPERTY IS PLACED IN A SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREA (100-YEAR FLOODPLAIN)?
If a FIRM indicates a building is now located in a SFHA (an “A Zone”), flood insurance is required if the property owner carries a mortgage, loan, or note from a federally-regulated lender. 

If you do not have a mortgage, it is still recommended that a property owner buy flood insurance.  Over the life of a 30-year loan, there is about a 3 times greater chance of having a flood in your home than having a fire.  Most homeowner’s insurance policies do not provide coverage for damage due to flooding.

 

16.  WHAT IS A “FEDERALLY-REGULATED LENDER?” 
Virtually every mortgage lender is Federally regulated.  If your lender is subject to the laws, rules, and regulations of any of the following, it is a Federally-regulated lender: 

  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)

  • National Credit Union Administration (NCUA)

  • Farm Credit Administration (FCA)

  • Office of Thrift Supervision

  • Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

  • Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

Additionally, if your lender ever sells any loans to the Federal National Mortgage Association ("Fannie Mae"), or to the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("Freddie Mac"), or to any other Government-Sponsored Enterprise, it is Federally-regulated. 

 

17. WHAT IS THE “GRANDFATHERING RULE” AND HOW CAN IT HELP ME?
The National Flood Insurance Program has "grandfathering" rules to recognize policyholders who complied with the flood map in place at the time of construction, or who maintain continuous flood insurance coverage.  These rules allow such policyholders to maintain a lower premium rating for their building even if their property changes to a high-risk designation when maps are redrawn. 

For example, if a property owner purchased flood insurance BEFORE a new map placed the property in a SFHA, and if the flood insurance has not lapsed, annual renewal premiums will usually cost less than if the flood insurance was not purchased until AFTER the new map went into effect. 

 

18.  HOW CAN I TELL IF I WILL BE required to purchase insurance? 
The new FIRMs are available for viewing by the public online at www.sjgov.org/pubworks/firmpanels.htm, or at the County Public Works Building at 1810 E. Hazelton Avenue in Stockton. You can also look up an address or parcel number using the Flood Zone Viewer at www.sjmap.org/floodzoneviewer.

By viewing these maps, you should be able to tell if your property was mapped into a SFHA (A-Zone) on October 16, 2009.  Contact your floodplain administrator (see information below) if you have any questions about how to interpret these maps. 

 

19.  WHAT HAPPENS IF I DID NOT BUY FLOOD INSURANCE BY OCTOBER 15, 2009? 
If you did not purchase flood insurance by October 15, 2009, and your property is located in a SFHA on the new maps, your lender will notify you that you are now required to purchase flood insurance. 

 

20.  IS THERE ANY WAY I CAN PAY LESS THAN THE EXPENSIVE “A-ZONE” PREMIUM IF I WAITED UNTIL AFTER OCTOBER 15, 2009 TO BUY FLOOD INSURANCE? 
In certain cases, IF your home was built AFTER the very first FIRM was published for your area, and you supply your insurer with extra documentation, they will charge you only the "Standard X" rate for your flood insurance policy.  This is more expensive than buying a Preferred Risk Policy before October 16, but if you are willing to gather the documentation for them, you will pay less than you would for an "A-Zone" policy.  Please see below for the effective dates of the first FIRM for your area.  Please ask your insurance agent about the details of this National Flood Insurance Program regulation. 

If your property is being mapped into a SFHA and your home was built BEFORE the effective date of the first FIRM for your area, you must purchase insurance NO LATER THAN the day before the map becomes effective in order to secure a "grandfathered Standard X" rate for your property. 

Please note that FEMA has announced that it will offer the lower-cost Preferred Risk Policy to property owners for a period of two years after a map change goes into effect.  This was announced in May of 2010.  Details about this will be posted as they become available. 

 

21.  WHAT HAPPENS IF I REFUSE TO PURCHASE FLOOD INSURANCE WHEN I HAVE BEEN NOTIFIED BY MY LENDER THAT I AM REQUIRED TO DO SO? 
If you do not purchase flood insurance when required, your lender will be forced to buy a policy for you in order to keep your loan in compliance with Federal regulations.  Your lender will then bill you for the expense, adding it to the outstanding balance of your loan.  These "force place" policies are much more expensive than flood insurance purchased by the property owner. 

 

22. WHAT WILL HAPPEN IF MY PROPERTY CHANGES FROM A HIGH-RISK TO A LOWER-RISK DESIGNATION?
When a building moves to a low- or moderate-risk area, there is no longer a Federally mandated requirement to purchase flood insurance.  However, the risk has only been reduced, not removed.  Flood insurance is still recommended.  Upon the adoption of new maps, you may be eligible for a lower-cost Preferred-Risk Policy (PRP).  Through your insurance agent, it is simple to submit a PRP application to avoid any gaps in your flood coverage.

 

23. HOW MIGHT THE NEW FLOOD MAPS AFFECT ME FINANCIALLY?
A financial impact from the new flood maps is a possible change in your property’s insurance requirements and rates.  These changes may influence property values. Your local agencies are working together and with the State and Federal governments to continue to improve flood protection in our area in order to increase public safety and decrease financial burdens and risk.  

If your property is in a floodplain and you have purchased flood insurance under the "grandfathering" rules, when you sell your home the new owner can continue to pay the lower "grandfathered" insurance rate, so long as there is no lapse in the policy.  This is a selling point, should you decide to sell your home, even if you personally do not have a mortgage that requires you to purchase the flood insurance now. 

Another possible financial impact would be the need to raise local funding for additional flood protection construction projects.  This would likely be done through voter-approved assessments.  An investment in improved flood protection infrastructure protects lives and property from floods.  It can have additional beneficial financial effects such as decreasing insurance premiums and increasing property values.

 

24. WHAT IF MY HOME OR BUSINESS IS MAPPED INTO A HIGH-RISK AREA BUT I BELIEVE THE DESIGNATION IS IN ERROR?
Flood map designations are always based on the best data available to engineers and local officials at the time areas within a community are surveyed and assessed.  Every effort is made to ensure that the maps reflect the most accurate and reliable information about the flood risk for all properties.  However, re-examining and updating flood hazard information for an entire community is often a multi-year process, and you may feel that you have more accurate data about your property than what is shown on the new maps.

As a mechanism to ensure that residents’ and property owners’ questions or concerns about the new map designations were addressed, a Public Comment Period took place between January 15, 2008, and April 16, 2009.  During this period, citizens had the opportunity to submit technical and/or scientific data to support a claim that their property had been improperly placed in a high-risk area.  Several areas of the County were removed during this period, including the town of Woodbridge and areas in Lodi and Ripon. Since the new FIRMs became effective and regulatory on October 16, 2009, property owners can still correct flood zone designations using the standard FEMA “Letter of Map Change” (“LOMC”) procedure.  More information about this process can be found on FEMA’s website:  www.msc.fema.gov.  [Click on Homeowners/Renters.] 

 


25.  WHY WERE SMITH CANAL LEVEES DE-ACCREDITED BY FEMA?
In order for FEMA to recognize a levee as providing 100-year flood protection, the community must demonstrate that the levee meets all of the certification requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 44, Section 65.10 which include criteria for design, operation plans, maintenance plans, and certification by a registered civil engineer.  The Smith Canal levees were not able to meet all of the requirements necessary to gain certification.

 

26.  ONLY DRAINAGE WATER FROM WITHIN THE CITY OF STOCKTON FLOWS TO SMITH CANAL DURING STORMS.  WHERE WOULD THE FLOOD WATER COME FROM?
During a 100-year flood, water from the San Joaquin River to the west will back up into Smith Canal.  Should the Smith Canal levees overtop or fail, the Country Club area, which lies at or near sea level in most areas, would be inundated by flood waters flowing through the canal from the San Joaquin River.

 

27.  WHAT IS BEING DONE TO PROVIDE 100-YEAR FLOOD PROTECTION FOR THE COUNTRY CLUB AREA?  
The San Joaquin Area Flood Control Agency (SJAFCA) is currently pursuing the design and construction of a gate structure at the mouth of Smith Canal.  The gate would normally rest on the bottom of the channel, allowing for boat traffic and normal tidal fluctuations.  During high water periods, the gate would be raised, preventing floodwaters from the San Joaquin River from entering Smith Canal.  The project is estimated to cost $30 million.

 

28.  CAN NEW HOMES, BUSINESSES, AND OTHER STRUCTURES BE BUILT IN SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREAS (SFHAs)?  New homes, business, and other structures can be built in SFHAs, however they must meet special design and construction requirements aimed at minimizing potential flood damage to the structure.  Among the requirements, habitable spaces must have the floor elevated above the 100-year flood elevation, which can be 10 feet or more above grade in some areas.  Contact your community floodplain administrator for all requirements specific to your proposed project.

 

29.  CAN IMPROVEMENTS, SUCH AS ADDITIONS AND REMODELS, BE MADE TO EXISTING HOMES, BUSINESSES, AND OTHER STRUCTURES WITHIN SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREAS?
Improvements, such as additions and remodels, can be made to existing homes, businesses, and other structures within SFHAs, however, if the cost of the improvement equals or exceeds 50 percent of the market value of the existing structure, it must be brought into compliance with current SFHA construction requirements, which may involve significant alterations, including elevating all habitable areas of the structure above the 100-year flood elevation.  Contact your community floodplain administrator for all requirements specific to your proposed project.

 

30.  WHY SHOULD AN OWNER SUFFER WHAT SEEMS TO BE A PENALTY FOR UPGRADING AND/OR IMPROVING A STRUCTURE? 
When a structure located in a SFHA is improved, additional real property is thereby put at risk for flood damage.  In an effort to discourage building in SFHAs, FEMA requires the County to impose higher restrictions on substantial improvements.  Structures located in a special flood hazard area that are not elevated to or above the base flood elevation (BFE) pose threats to the health and safety of the occupants of these structures, as well.  Over time it is not only important to protect existing structures through substantial improvement requirements, but also to protect the health and lives of the citizens that occupy these structures.

 

31.  IF A HOME, BUSINESS, OR OTHER STRUCTURE WITHIN A SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREA IS DAMAGED BY FIRE, FLOOD, WIND, OR OTHER SOURCE OF DAMAGE, CAN IT BE REPAIRED?
Homes, businesses, and other structures within SFHAs can be repaired if damaged by fire, flood, wind, or any other source of damage, however, if the cost of the repair equals or exceeds 50 percent of the pre-damage market value of the structure, it must be brought into compliance with current SFHA construction requirements, which may involve significant alterations, including elevating all habitable areas of the structure above the 100-year BFE.  Contact your community floodplain administrator for all requirements specific to your proposed project.

 

32.  THE NEW SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREAS ARE DESIGNATED “ZONE A” WITH NO BASE FLOOD ELEVATION (BFE) SHOWN.  WHO DETERMINES THE REGULATORY BFE FOR THESE AREAS?
T
he community floodplain administrators use study methods and engineering analyses accepted by FEMA to determine regulatory BFEs for the new SFHAs. 

 

33.  WHAT IF OUR COMMUNITY DID NOT PARTICIPATE IN THE NFIP?  
There would be several consequences if our community did not participate in the NFIP.  The biggest consequence is that affordable flood insurance would not be available for any buildings, including residential and commercial.  If someone wanted to obtain flood insurance, they would have to go through a private insurance company and pay exorbitant premiums.  As a result of non-participation, there would be no Federal grants, loans, or mortgage insurance for structures located in a SFHA. Federal disaster assistance would be unavailable following a declared disaster.  Owners of buildings with conventional loans would also be required to notify buyers or lessees if a property were in a SFHA, and that Federal disaster relief would not be available in a declared disaster.

 

34. WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION?
Visit www.sjgov.org/pubworks/  for more information.  The website is periodically updated to include new information about the floodplain remapping process and any upcoming public meetings, as well as links to other sources of flood protection information.  FEMA also has the new FIRMs available on their website. 

GENERAL RESOURCES:

  •  FEMA website on mapping:  www.msc.fema.gov

  •  FEMA Map Assistance Center 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627) Open Mon-Fri, 5am-3:30pm PST

  • To view, or purchase current flood hazard maps for a nominal fee: www.msc.fema.gov or 1-800=358-9616

  • General information about flood insurance: www.floodsmart.gov

  • To find a local agent: 1-888-FLOOD29 or check your local Yellow pages

  • Public Meetings: Dates and locations will be announced as scheduled.

  • Please visit www.sjgov.org/pubworks to get more information about San Joaquin County Flood Insurance Rate Maps, flood protection information, and flood emergency planning.

  • Go to www.sjmap.org/floodzoneviewer to view the flood zone in which your parcel is located.  Please contact the Flood Management Division at (209) 468-3605 if your parcel is located next to a river, stream, slough, or other waterway. 

  

  

LOCAL RESOURCES:

City of Stockton www.stocktongov.com or (209) 937-8561

City of Manteca www.ci.manteca.ca.us or (209) 239-8460

City of Lodi www.lodi.gov or (209) 333-6801

City of Lathrop www.ci.lathrop.ca.us or (209) 941-7430

San Joaquin County www.sjgov.org or (209) 468-3063

San Joaquin County Office of Emergency Services www.sjgov.org/oes/ or (209) 953-6200

 

 

THE COUNTY’S FIRST FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP EFFECTIVE DATES: 

 SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY (UNINCORPORATED)  MAY 15, 1980

 CITY OF STOCKTON  JANUARY 3, 1979

 CITY OF TRACY  JUNE 18, 1987

 CITY OF LODI  MARCH 1, 1978 

CITY OF MANTECA  DECEMBER 16, 2005 

CITY OF LATHROP  MAY 15, 1980 (SJC) 

CITY OF RIPON  SEPTEMBER 24, 1984 

CITY OF ESCALON  N/A


 

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